Soldiers of Mongolia

» Posted by on Sep 29, 2019 in Fighter, General | Comments Off on Soldiers of Mongolia

Soldiers of Mongolia

Genghis Khan’s soldiers dominated their enemies because of their training and discipline. All soldiers were proficient with the bow and arrow, and they could have more than one indicator in the sky at a time! Their accuracy was legendary and unequalled in the world. They could even shoot backwards, without missing a target. These horsemen and soldiers carried composite bows which were made of wood, bone and ligament and were their prized possessions. When not at war they trained daily with the emphasis on the bow and arrow. Apart from their bows, they carried swords, similar to sabres and maces and axes for hand to hand fighting with the leading cavalry carrying spears which they used to thrust and also to throw.

Bow and Arrow

Mongol bows were superior to any user in the Western world and the Middle East. Twice as effective as the English longbow, they could easily reach 200 meters and sometimes as far as 250 meters (the Japanese Yumi bow) could equal this, but were much longer, sometimes longer then the archer was high!), which decimated the enemy before they could retaliate.


They could fire six arrows in a minute – one every ten seconds! They had differently designed indicators for different targets. Long-range, short-range and heads for killing. Arrows were used for penetrating the enemies armour. Some had whistles which could intimidate their enemies and some were dipped in naphtha and set alight to set fires in the where they landed. The rider’s accuracy at shooting was due to their ability to be able to release the arrow when their horse was in mid-stride with all hooves off the ground at the same time, giving a stable platform for a milli-second.

Spears & Shields

Spears were used by horsemen and foot soldiers alike. They were used for throwing and for stabbing at close quarters. The heavier horseman’s spear was 4 meters long, and the head had a hook that was used for pulling enemy horsemen from their mounts. Shields were used by all of the armies – foot soldiers and horsemen alike. The shield is small and round, made of wood and covered in horse or cowhide. These had to be light so that all the weaponry could be carried into war without hampering the wielder.

Armour

Mongolian armour was of a similar style to those used by most armies in the east. The armour was made up of plates, each three or four layers thick and glued together. These were then laced with leather cords in such a way that, if the wearer bent over in any direction, would slide under each other without hinder body movement. The affair was lined underneath with silk which had the incredible strength to stop any arrowhead from penetrating through the leather armour without injuring the wearer. The horse’s armour covered the sides, the back behind the saddle, the chest down to the knees and an iron piece covered the front of the head.